Game Development Reference
In-Depth Information
Determining Cap Necessity
The near-clip volume is bounded by the planes connecting the near rectangle to
the world-space light position L . The four world-space normal directions
N for
the near-clip volume are given by
(
)
(
)
=−
RR
×
LLL
,
,
L
R ,
N
(
)
i
i
i
1mod4
x
y
z
w
i
where each
R is the world-space vertex of the near rectangle given by
i
=
RWR , W is the transformation from camera space to world space, and the
values of
i
i
R are given by Equation (10.17). The corresponding world-space
planes
K bounding the near-clip volume are given by
1
()()()
K
=
NNN NR
,
,
,
.
i
i
x
i
y
i
z
i
i
N
i
The near-clip volume is closed by adding a fifth plane that is coincident with the
near plane and has a normal pointing toward the light source. For a light source
lying in front on the near plane, the fifth plane K is given by
(
)
1T
K
=
W
0, 0,
1,
n
.
4
For an object that is bounded by a sphere having center C and radius r , we do not
need to render a capped shadow volume if
⋅<−
C
r
for any i .
K
i
Exercises for Chapter 10
(
)
1.
Use a technique similar to that described in Section 9.1 to derive the
3, 3
entry of a projection matrix based on the matrix
M given by Equation
(10.10) that offsets depth values at a camera-space depth P by a small
amount δ .
infinite
2.
Write a program that renders a stencil shadow for a triangle mesh illuminat-
ed by a single point light source. Assume that the triangle mesh is specified
such that each of n triangles indexes three entries in an array of m vertices.
The program should precalculate an edge list, determine the edges belonging
to the model's silhouette with respect to the light source, and render the ex-
truded silhouette edges using the stencil buffer operations described in Sec-
tion 10.3.6.
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