Game Development Reference
In-Depth Information
says, “Supporting ads for other games might sound counterintuitive, but there's money to be had in this
play.”(Chartboost and Kiip are two companies offering this service for mobile devices.) Although this kind of
service is more applicable to in-app offers in mobile or in social games at this point, he adds that web-based
games are likely to add support for things like this.
Beyond this, Pidgeon sees growing value in secondary markets, in which players can trade valuable items
with others on a site hosted by the company (which typically takes a cut of the sales).
Although this model has been popular with Asian games and niche online game worlds like Second Life and
IMVU, it was recently given huge market validation by Blizzard Entertainment, which designed and integrated
a secondary market for Diablo III, the latest installment of its epic franchise.
Third-party service providers like Live Gamer already manage secondary markets for numerous games of various sizes, and it's likely that
competitors will soon emerge.
As HTML5 Rises, Does Flash Have a
Future?
To be sure, the graphics capacities enabled by HTML5 are indeed impressive.
Flash is near-synonymous with web games, but the rise of HTML5 as a development platform with rich 3D
graphics has inspired some to believe Flash is dying, and soon won't be worth your time.
Facebook game platform developer Cory Ondrejka (formerly CTO of Linden Lab and co-creator of Second
Life) recently told me he believes that HTML5 will make it possible for web games to catch up with consoles
in terms of graphics by 2013. By “catch up,” he means that by 2013, web-based game graphics will be a year
or two behind console-based graphics, as opposed to 10-20 years, where they are now. His reasoning is that
JavaScript (which runs in web browsers) can already get to 50 percent of the speed of C code (which runs on
most console games), even if there's ultimately a threefold performance penalty. At that range, he argues, web-
based game deployment is an appealing option for developers who might otherwise develop for consoles. (See
Figure 10-1 . )
 
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