Game Development Reference
In-Depth Information
design and programming elements are completely integrated. This greatly speeds up the simplicity
and efficiency of the game-design process and makes it a whole lot of fun as well.
Tens of thousands of people around the world have made a career out of designing games with Flash.
With this topic and a little bit of practice, you could become one of them.
Basics you need to have
Surprisingly, video game design can be a relatively low-tech affair. Here's the basic equipment you
need:
A reasonably up-to-date computer, either running Windows or the latest version of Mac OS X.
An installed copy of Adobe Flash CS4 (version 10). You can download Flash directly from the
Adobe website: sss*]`k^a*_ki. Although it requires an initial investment, it's a bargain for
such a powerful piece of professional software. Adobe also offers upgrades from previous ver-
sions at an extremely reasonable cost. You can try Flash for a free 30-day trial period if you
want to make completely sure it's for you.
Things you need to know
This topic assumes that you haven't had any experience using Flash—or any experience with computer
programming. You'll go on a step-by-step journey through these fascinating worlds. If you want to
learn to design games from scratch, this topic is all you need to get started.
That said, Flash and the ActionScript programming language are huge topics that you could easily
spend a lifetime studying, and no one topic will be able to provide all the answers to all the questions
you might have while you're learning. If you've never used Flash before, I highly recommend that you
spend a bit of time reading through the documentation and working through some of the exercises
and sample projects in Adobe's online Help system. (To access them, select Help ° Flash Help from
Flash's menu.) You might also find it very beneficial to spend a weekend with a good introductory
topic on Flash, such as one of the excellent topics for Flash beginners published by friends of ED.
These resources will answer some of the more basic questions that you might have about how to use
Flash and what it's capable of without the added complexity of having to absorb some of the concep-
tual issues of game design and ActionScript programming at the same time.
But, hey, if you want to dive into the deep end right away, I'm with you! This topic is a great a place to
start and is the only resource you need.
And the things you don't need to know
Perhaps even more enlightening is what you don't have to know to be able to make use of this topic:
Math (not much, anyway!)
Computer programming
Website design
 
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