Game Development Reference
In-Depth Information
The conjugate of a quaternion is q * = [ w ,- v ]
The inverse is q -1 = q * / N ( q ). Therefore, for unit quaternions the
inverse is the same as the conjugate.
Addition and subtraction involves q 0 ± q 1 =[ w 0 + w 1 , v 0 + v 1 ]
Multiplication is given by q 0 q 1 =[ w 0 w 1 - v 0 v 1 , v 0
v 1 + w 0 v 1 + w 1 v 0 ];
this operation is non-commutative, i.e. q 0 q 1 is not the same as q 1 q 0 .
The identity for quaternions depends on the operation; it is [1, 0 ] (where
0 is a zero vector (0, 0, 0)) for multiplication and [0, 0 ] for addition and
subtraction.
×
Rotation involves v
= qvq *, where v = [0, v ].
Turning a unit quaternion into a rotation matrix results in
1- 2 y 2 - 2 x 2
2 xy + 2 wz
2 xz - 2 wy
1- 2 x 2 - 2 z 2
R =
2 xy - 2 wz
2 yz - 2 wx
1- 2 x 2 - 2 y 2
2 xz + 2 wy
2 yz - 2 wx
We will consider the uses of quaternions for smooth interpolation of
camera orientation and techniques for converting quickly between the
different representations of rotation in Chapter 8.
Rotation about a point other than
the origin
To rotate about an arbitrary point, which in
many CGI applications is called the pivot
point , involves first translating a vertex to
the origin, doing the rotation then translating
it back. If the vertex [1, 1, 1] T were rotated
about the point (2, 0, 0), then we want to
consider the point (2, 0, 0) to be the origin.
By subtracting (2, 0, 0) from [1, 1, 1] T we
can now rotate as though this is the origin
then add (2, 0, 0) back to the rotated
vertex.
Figure 1.7 Rotation about a
pivot point.
Scaling the object
The size of the object has so far been unaffected by the operations
considered. If we want to scale the object up or down we can use another
 
Search Nedrilad ::




Custom Search