Game Development Reference
In-Depth Information
9.6 A New Take on Quaternion-Based Constraints
The Jacobians of any quaternion-based constraint can be computed using just one
master Jacobian matrix and various projections. This is done using the matrix rep-
resentation described in Section 9.5. Consider two rigid bodies with quaternions
r , s
and angular velocities ω (1) and ω (2) , respectively. The definition of the
relative quaternion is q
H
. The first task is to relate the rate of change of q to
the angular velocities ω (1) and ω (2) . The time derivative of q is
q = r s + r s =( r r ) r s + r s ( s s )
=( r r ) q + q ( s s ) .
H
(9.9)
So now, using the matrix representation of the quaternion product, taking the left
product using
P
( q ) on the first term and the right product using
Q
( q ) on the
second, and substituting the identities in Equation (9.7), we have
1
2 P
T ω (1) + 1
T ω (2)
q =
( q )
P
2 Q
( q )
P
(9.10)
1
2 E
( q ) T ω (1) + 1
( q ) T ω (2) .
=
2 G
The only Jacobians you need for all three quaternion constraints defined here are
these. It might seem that we took a very long detour to arrive at Equation (9.10),
which is very simple since we just need matrices
( q ) and G ( q ) in the end.
Looking at the indicators defined above in Equations (9.2), (9.4), and (9.6), the
different Jacobians are simply different projections of the same proto-Jacobian,
namely,
E
1
1
G (1)
2 P E ( q ) T ,
G (2)
2 P G ( q ) T ,
lock =
lock =
1
1
G (1)
2 P hinge E ( q ) T ,
G (2)
2 P hinge G ( q ) T ,
hinge =
hinge =
(9.11)
1
1
G (1)
2 P CV E ( q ) T ,
G (2)
2 P CV G ( q ) T .
CV =
CV =
9.7 Why It Works
The dot product representation of the indicators for rotational constraints is as
follows:
n (1)
·
u (2)
0
0
0
=
,
n (1)
v (2)
c dlock =
·
u (1)
· n (2)
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