Game Development Reference
In-Depth Information
Here, ~ q is the conjugate of the unit quaternion q . Here's the code:
inline Quaternion QRotate(Quaternion q1, Quaternion q2)
{
return q1*q2*(~q1);
}
QVRotate
This function rotates the vector v by the unit quaternion q according to the formula:
p ' = ( q )( v )(~ q )
Here, ~ q is the conjugate of the unit quaternion q . Here's the code:
inline Vector QVRotate(Quaternion q, Vector v)
{
Quaternion t;
t = q*v*(~q);
return t.GetVector();
}
MakeQFromEulerAngles
This function constructs a quaternion from a set of Euler angles.
For a given set of Euler angles, yaw (ψ), pitch (τ), and roll (φ), defining rotation about
the z-axis, then the y-axis, and then the z-axis, you can construct the representative
rotation quaternion. You do this by first constructing a quaternion for each Euler angle
and then multiplying the three quaternions following the rules of quaternion multipli‐
cation. Here are the three quaternions representing each Euler rotation angle:
q roll = [cos(φ/2), (sin(φ/2)) i + 0 j + 0 k ]
q pitch = [cos(τ /2), 0 i + (sin(τ /2)) j + 0 k ]
q yaw = [cos(ψ /2), 0 i + 0 j + (sin(ψ /2)) k ]
Each one of these quaternions is of unit length. 2
Now you can multiply these quaternions to obtain a single one that represents the ro‐
tation, or orientation, defined by the three Euler angles:
q = q yaw q pitch q roll
2. You can verify this by recalling the trigonometric relation cos 2 θ + sin 2 θ = 1.
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