Game Development Reference
In-Depth Information
6
MANAGING YOUR ASSETS AND WORKING
WITH GRAPHICS
CHAPTER OUTLINE
A Better File Format 91
A Few Words about Organization
92
Working with Graphics
93
Raster Formats to Use
95
Compression 96
Smoothing 99
Deblocking 99
External Image Tools
99
Key Points to Remember
101
While code is certainly a huge part of most games, the assets the code
manipulates (art, sounds, text) are usually equally important. In all
previous versions of Flash, all binary resources were stored in a pro-
prietary format known as FLA. Unlike most programming languages
where such resources reside as individual files separate from the
code, every Flash file has an associated library that contains all the
assets that will get bundled into the SWF at compile time. Luckily for
us, this is one of the biggest and most welcome changes in Flash CS5.
A Better File Format
The FLA source file format of Flash has been a source of consterna-
tion for many developers over the years. It is completely binary and
proprietary and can often be bulky if uncompressed assets are
imported into it. This makes it very unfriendly for version control
systems, like subversion, as each time the file is versioned it must
upload the entire file. When you
'
re working with a 30- to 40-MB FLA
file (due to large audio assets or bitmaps), checking that file just
10 times will use 300
400 MB of disk space. In CS5, Adobe introduced
a new file format called XFL. It consists of an XML file that stores all
of the information about your settings, library, and timelines, and all
of the raw assets in your library zipped into one file. In addition, and
-
 
 
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