Game Development Reference
In-Depth Information
5
THE LEAST YOU CAN DO VERSUS
AN ARCHITECT ' S APPROACH
CHAPTER OUTLINE
Basic Encapsulation: Classes and Containers 78
Store Relevant Values as Variables and Constants
79
Don ' t Rely on Your Stage 80
Don ' t Use Frameworks or Patterns You Don ' t Understand or That Don ' t
Apply 81
Know When It ' s Okay to Phone It In and When It Definitely Isn ' t
81
Transitioning to Architecture
82
OOP Concepts
82
Encapsulation
83
Inheritance 83
Polymorphism 84
Interfaces 84
Practical OOP in Game Development 85
The Singleton: A Good Document Pattern
86
Summary
89
The subtitle of this topic may be HowtoFollowBestPractices,but
it
and basic pitfalls you
should avoid when getting started. As such, the first half will look
at the bare minimum any Flash game developer should do, regard-
less of the circumstances. Once you have the basics known, you
can
'
s only fair to cover some
worst practices
ll exam-
ine how to look at your games like an architect from day one.
One of the most common phrases I hear developers (including
myself from time to time) use to justify lackluster coding is,
graduate
to the second half of this chapter where we
'
Well,
thisprojectjustdidn
The implication here is that
if the developer had more time to do the work, it would have been
done better. I certainly don
'
t afford me the time.
'
t disagree with that premise. Before
I worked at a game company, I was employed by an interactive ad
agency. Anyone who has ever worked at an ad agency knows that there
is never enough time on any project, ever. Forget formalized design
patterns and wireframes, we
'
re talking about timelines in which it
'
s
 
 
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