Game Development Reference
In-Depth Information
3
A PLAN IS WORTH A THOUSAND ASPIRIN
CHAPTER OUTLINE
Step 1 25
Step 2 26
Step 3 27
Step 4 28
Step 5 30
Methods Required
31
Step 6 (Optional)
32
I
ve built a lot of games in Flash over the years. Some have taken
less than a week, and some have stretched on for several months.
Whether they had huge budgets or practically no budget at all, one
common thread has come back over and over again: the projects
that were well planned out and clearly defined went smoothly and
those that were not didn
'
'
t. Planning a game thoroughly can be a
tedious step, but it
smucheasiertochangeyourmindorpredict
problems on paper than it is in the heat of development. How
exactly you go about documenting and outlining your game is a
matter of personal preference and a measure of just how anal-
retentive you
'
'
re willing to be. Here are some strategies that work
for me.
Step 1
Be able to describe the game from a bird
s-eye view in one to two
sentences. Most any game idea, no matter how complex, can be
summed up in this manner, even if it leaves out a lot of details.
Beingabletodistillagamedowntoitsmostbasicpremisekeeps
youontrackandactsasa
'
'
re
building. If you work at a company building games for clients,
you
bigger picture
reminder of what you
re likely dealing with marketing people, not gamers; they tend
to appreciate this level of succinctness. For example, a summary of
Pac-Man could be as follows:
Move through a maze collecting food while avoiding ghosts that
are trying to kill you.
'
 
 
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