Game Development Reference
In-Depth Information
equation using what are known as the inverse trig functions. The
names of these functions match their counterparts, but prefixed
with the word arc . In this case, we need to use arctangent to find
the value of each of these angles.
B
A
=
arctan
15/20
ð
Þ
90 °
A
B
=
arctan
20/15
ð
Þ
Adjacent = 20
Based on these equations, angle A would be ~37
°
and B would
Figure 11.6 A triangle
where we know just two
of the sides, but no
angles and no
hypotenuse.
be ~53
°
. If you add these together with the right angle of 90
°
,you
can see that we indeed have a proper triangle of 180
.
For our final theoretical example, look back again to Fig. 11.6 .
Suppose all you needed was the hypotenuse and you weren
°
t inter-
ested in the angles at all. You could do what we did previously,
using arctangent to get the values of the angles and then use those
angles with either sine or cosine to determine the hypotenuse.
However, as this is a multiple-step process, it is inefficient when
we have a much quicker way. In addition to the standard trig
functions, there is another equation to determine the third side of
a triangle when you know the other two, which is known as the
Pythagorean theorem. The theorem states that the hypotenuse of a
triangle, squared, is equal to the sum of the squares of the other
two sides. Let
'
s look at this as an equation, calling the two shorter
sides a and b and the hypotenuse c .
'
a 2
b 2
c 2
+
=
Finding any one side when you know the other two is just a
simple permutation of this equation as follows:
q
ð
q
ð
q
ð
c
=
a 2
+
b 2
, b
=
c 2
a 2
, a
=
c 2
b 2
Þ
Þ
Þ
For our purposes, we know sides a and b to be 15 and 20 (or 20
and 15; it doesn
t really matter). From these values, the hypotenuse
would therefore be equal to
'
(15 2 +20 2 ), or 25.
Now that we have defined these functions and have seen how
to use them, let
s look at a couple of practical examples in Flash
and how to apply the functions there.
A fairly common use of the trig functions is finding the angle of
the mouse cursor relative to another point. This angle can then be
applied to the rotation of a DisplayObject to make the object
'
look
at the mouse. If you open the MousePointer.fla file, you
ll find just
such an example setup. It consists of a triangle MovieClip called
'
on the Stage. One of the corners of the triangle is colored
differently to differentiate the direction it is pointing. For simplicity,
the ActionScript to perform this math is on the timeline; if you
were using this code as part of something larger, it would make
sense to put it in a class. Let
pointer
'
s look at this code now.
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