Game Development Reference
In-Depth Information
9
PUT THE VIDEO BACK IN VIDEO GAME
CHAPTER OUTLINE
Video Codecs 141
External Video Uses: Cutscenes and Menus
142
Encoding a Cutscene
143
CutsceneManager 145
Using the CutsceneManager
151
Video on the Timeline
152
File Size 152
Ease of Use and Library Clutter
152
Performance 153
Free Motion Blur 153
Setting Up an Internal Video
153
Summary
156
Video is probably used more than you might initially think in Flash
games. Video is a great format for noninteractive cutscenes because
the performance is consistently satisfactory (Adobe has put a great
deal of effort into making sure that video plays smoothly in Flash),
and it can be created and stored completely externally to a game. In
this chapter, we
ll see how it is also an excellent container for charac-
ter animations, particle effects, and other small in-game animations.
We
'
ll also explore the Adobe Media Encoder that comes with Flash
CS5 and the different settings to use for each type of video.
'
Video Codecs
Flash can handle a few different formats of video, all of which cater
to different uses. The first, and the oldest, is Sorenson Spark.
Although it tends to show the most compression artifacts on a
higher-resolution video, its processor requirements are modest,
and it requires the least horsepower of any of Flash
scodecs.It
works well for a game that needs to support older machines and
where the video isn
'
t going to get very large. In Flash 8, Flash
introduced the On2 VP6 codec. The compression quality and file
size are much improved over Spark, albeit at a higher cost of CPU
overhead. The best feature of VP6 is that it can be encoded with an
'
 
 
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