Game Development Reference
In-Depth Information
8
TURN IT UP TO 11: WORKING WITH AUDIO
CHAPTER OUTLINE
Formats to Use 117
Export Settings to Use 118
CS5.5 Feature Incremental Compilation
119
Using External Files 121
Tools for Working with Sounds
121
Scripting Sounds 122
Understanding the Sound Classes
123
The SoundEngine Class
123
Using the Class 136
The SoundMixer Class
139
Sound is the most sorely overlooked component in the world of
Flash games. Because it can
s very often tacked on at
theendofaproject,whensomeonerealizes
'
tbeseen,it
'
this game really
needs sound.
It can mean the difference between a completely flat
experience and a very rich one. Most of the best Flash games I
'
ve
played had excellent sound design. It
'
s not just that they used
sound effects and/or music; it
s that they paid attention to how the
sounds blended together in the final mix. In this chapter, I
'
ll out-
line the best formats to use for audio in games and different
approaches to control sound within a game.
'
Formats to Use
I
ve heard many schools of thought from different developers on
what formats they prefer. Some like nothing but WAV or AIFF files,
both uncompressed formats. Others prefer MP3s that have already
been compressed and are ready for export. The source format for
audio doesn
'
t matter quite as much as it does for graphics because
audio is almost always re-encoded, when Flash exports a SWF. The
export settings, which I will outline shortly, become very important
at this point because they will determine how the audio ultimately
sounds in a game. Much like graphic formats, I find that a blend of
the two types based on how they
'
'
re being used is the best way to
make format decisions.
 
 
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