Game Development Reference
In-Depth Information
K R
K
Í
Í
In human to human interactions, we see many
forces at play that influence one person to agree
or take the side of another in a discussion. These
influences need to be taken into account when
collaborative work is undertaken. Even the size
of a group (Fay et al, 2000) can change the way
in which partners are influenced, and by whom.
Collaborative FEPs may create an affinity
with one or more entities and are more likely to
accept their position during negotiation. Possible
methods for obtaining an affinity with one or more
FEPs include:
{ , ..,
r
r
}
(8)
1
m
{ , .. }
k
k
Í
{ , ..,
r
r
}
1
q
1
m
To influence group collective knowledge, re-
sulting responses r m that contribute to K must be
changed in some way. Assuming that all responses
contribute to collective knowledge:
K R
k
=
{ , .., }
k
=
{ , ..,
r
r
}
(9)
1
q
1
m
i.e.
q m
=
1. The degree to which one FEP's responses
convey a perception/opinion that matches
that of another FEP. The more that a partner's
position matches that of another partner, it
becomes more likely that the partner will
“trust” the statements of that partner.
2. Some arbitrary/authoritative influence fac-
tor that has the partner tending towards the
position of one or more other partners. An
example in a business sense might be senior-
ity and/or position within an organization.
3. Trade: changing a given position in order
to influence another partner's position on
another item in the collaborative process.
4. A pre-existing relationship (for example a
friendship) that exists beyond the scope of
the collaborative process
During the negotiation phase, an influence
function changes the response for a given partner's
initial decision based on the degree of influence
the other partners have with the first partner.
i r
(
)
=
p
* (
r
r
)
(10)
pk
nf
pn
pk
1
− ≠
n n i
,
where i r p ( ) is the influenced response which is
the sum of all influence factors p nf multiplied by
the response difference partner p n and the partner
under influence p k . FEPs using this influence
function cannot influence themselves.
Assessment Stage
During the collaborative process, any partner
p l , where l k , may ask a question q m of any
other partner p k in order to receive a response r m ,
where m = j + i
At the conclusion of the negotiation phase, the
Leader provides a summary of the collaborative
engagement. Based on the information obtained,
each goal may be evaluated in terms of the result-
ing outcomes. The assessments are relayed to the
participating partners.
r
= (
f p q
,
)
(7)
m
k
m
The set of Group Collective Knowledge K
obtained by the group through the collaborative
process is a subset of the responses obtained dur-
ing the collaborative process.
Conclusion Stage
At either a specified time, or when the objectives
of the play scenario have been completed success-
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