Game Development Reference
In-Depth Information
relationships as being the main positive aspect of
gaming, this is also recognized by analyzing the
game mechanism as well as the interaction and
communicative tools supplied by the companies
responsible for the four games. This demand was
less experienced in Gladiatus because the player´s
personal success isn't linked to the group.
However, this study confirmed that there is a
clear distinction between the gaming world and
the real world. This can be verified by two main
aspects: (1) a large part of players believe that
they develop capacities such as how to work in a
group and solve problems but they are unable to
use these skills in a professional or educational
environment (2) a large part of players does not
consider that games help academically or profes-
sionally.
Due to the development of skills and com-
petences developed by the players such as
communication, collaboration between teams,
knowledge search, and fast decision making, the
development of pedagogical and instructional
models which incorporate the cognitive benefits
brought by electronic games is essential and
therefore should be considered not only in terms
of what one could learn with electronic games,
but also how that process works under that leisure
environment. One must bear in mind how these
online environments can be used as an asset in
the process of motivation, in the quest for new
challenges, in the persistence in accomplishing
objectives and especially the improvement of
interpersonal communication.
Beedle, J. B., & Wright, V. H. (2007). Perspec-
tives from multiplayer vídeo Gamers. In Gibson,
D., Aldrich, C., & Prensky, M. (Eds.), Games
and simulations in online learning: Research
and Development Frameworks (pp. 150-174).
Hershey: IGI Global.
Christofoli, J. F. (2006). Authority Distribution in
a proxy-based massively multiplayer game archi-
tecture . Tallahassee: The Florida State University.
Ferdig, R. E. (2007). Preface: Learning and teach-
ing with electronic games. Journal of Educational
Multimedia and Hypermedia , 16 (3), 217-223.
Galarneau, L. (2005). Spontaneous Communities
of Learning: Learning Ecosystems in Massively
Multiplayer Online Gaming Environments. In
Proceedings of DiGRA 2005 Conference: Chang-
ing Views - Worlds in Play .
Galarneau, L., & Zibit, M. (2007). Online games
for 21st century skills. In Gibson, D., Aldrich, C.,
& Prensky, M. (Eds.), Games and simulations
in online learning: Research and development
frameworks (pp. 59-88). Hershey: IGI Global.
Gibson, D., Halverson, W., & Riedel, E. (2007).
Gamer teachers. In Gibson, D., Aldrich, C., &
Prensky, M. (Eds.), Games and simulations in
online learning: Research and Development
Frameworks (pp. 175-188). Hershey: IGI Global.
Goldstein, J. (2005). Violent video games. In
Raessens, J., & Goldstein, J. (Eds.), Handbook
of Computer Game Studies (pp. 341-357). Cam-
bridge, MA: MIT Press.
Graells, P. M. (2001). Los Videojuegos: las claves
del êxito. In Enciclopedia Virtual de Tecnologia
Educativa . Retrieved October 29, 2008, from
http://dewey.uab.es/ pmarques/videojue.htm.
REFERENCES
Akilli, G. K. (2007). Games and Simulations: A
New approach in education? In Gibson, D., Aldrich,
C., & Prensky, M. (Eds.), Games and simulations
in online learning: Research and Development
Frameworks (pp. 1-20). Hershey: IGI Global.
Hobbs, M., Brown, E., & Gordon, M. (2006).
Using a Virtual World for Transferable Skills in
Gaming Education. Higher Education Academy
Subject Network for Information & Computer
Sciences , 5(3), s/p.
Alves, L. (2005). Game Over: Jogos Electrónicos
e Violência . São Paulo: Futura.
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