Game Development Reference
In-Depth Information
Other collection activities can happen almost by mistake. In the 2D platformer
versions of Super Mario Brothers , collecting coins, stars, and other items
happens just as the player moves the character through the levels, as the
items are unavoidable. They are not challenging to pick up, and the number
found collected is a record of progression through the level rather than
achievement.
The original Doom and Wolfenstein 3D games introduced the concept
of collecting points for finding secret rooms, killing all the guards and or
monsters, and finding extra damage power-ups and the like. A count at the
end of each level reveals how many have been found. A lack of finding them
does not stop the player from progressing, but can give some incentive to
replay that level to find all the added extras.
For Research
This is by no means an exhaustive list of game action mechanics. If you
are interested in learning more, visit the links:
http://lostgarden.com/2006/10/what-are-game-mechanics.html
http://gamification.org/wiki/Game_Mechanics
http://gamestudies.org/0802/articles/sicart
4.4 Developing with Some Simple
Game Mechanics
This section revisits a number of the primary game action mechanics with
some practical implementations in Unity. Note that more than one mechanic
is required in order to make a playable game prototype or to make an
interactive application slightly game-like. For example, matching marbles
of the same color is not a game. It's just matching. But matching as many
marbles as you can, of the same color in 2 minutes, instantly provides the
player with a challenge, a goal, and a reward.
4.4.1 Matching and Sorting
Matching is a simple yet compelling game mechanic that sees the player
scanning a number of items to find ones that are similar. This mechanic occurs
in games such as Bejeweled , in which the player swaps adjacent gemstones
arranged in a grid to make horizontal or vertical sets of three or more of the
same colored gem. When a line is created, it disappears from the grid and the
player gets some points. The matching mechanic is found across a wide range
of popular games such as solitaire , where card suits are matched, monopoly , in
which property colors are matched, memory , where images must be matched,
to even kinect games, where body poses are matched.
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